CHESSBOOK REVIEWS


Latest book reviews of 1 November  2015
BOOKS REVIEWS BY JOHN ELBURG.

Wilhelminalaan 33 

7261 BP RUURLO 

The Netherlands.
John Elburg



                                              Chess Books      


Joseph Henry Blackburne. A Chess Biography by Tim Harding
2015
McFarland & Company,Inc.,Publishers Box 611
Jefferson,North Carolina 28640.
http://www.mcfarlandpub.com
592 pages
Price $75.00
ISBN: 978-0-7864-7473-8
95 illustrations, 1,186 games, appendices, notes, bibliography, indexes
592pp. library binding (8.5 x 11) 2015



This wonderful created book from Tim Harding is a full biography  and game collection about the legendary Joseph Henry Blackburne 1841-1924,  nicknamed "The Black Death"
who was one of the greatest chess players of his time.
As Tim Harding writes: Blackburne’s achievement was massive. His exhibitions of blindfold play first made his name as a young man of twenty,and these performances played an important role in establishing his reputation and sustaining his income.
Between December 1861 and January 1912,he played over 2400 games in more than 320 blindfold exhibitions.
Blackburne competeted in nearly every major nineteen century.
So far no real biography of Blackburne has ever appeared so this massive undertaking from Tim Harding is a gift to every chess players who is interested in exciting chess,yes I am aware the standard book on Mr.Blackburne’s Fames at Chess appeared in 1899 but it does not cover the last 15 years of his playing career and it only holds a small 407 games.
This can not be compared with Harding’s massive research work with nearly 1200 games and 56 checkmate problems.
Many games cover excellent annotations of that time and are all carefully checked by Tim Harding.
As we can see Blackburne had a creative attacking style and that make his games very attractive to play throw.
Blackburne best results was 1st equal with Steinitz at Vienna 1873, where the commentators nicknamed him with  "the Black Death" by the way Steinitz won the play-off.For the interested reader please also see “Der erste Wiener internationale Schachcongress im Jahre 1873,Band 75 Olms 1986.
Blackburne earned his living from prize money and his club engagements where provided in gratitude by amateur players around the country when he was in bad health or old age.
As Tim Harding explains: Some questions about Blackburne’s family remain unanswerable unless the continuing process of digitising official records turns up new clues. Because his family line appears to have died out, there are no notebooks,diares,or personal letters-the manuscript material so valuable to biographers exploring the interior lives of there subjects.
Blackburne rarely gave interviews and when he did, his statement cannot always be taken as literal truth. There are many stories about his in circulation, especially concerning his drinking habitis,but such are only included if corroborated or at least set in some likely context, and there are enough true stories about him in this book to satisfy anyone.
Blackburne dies at home early on Monday 1 September 1924 of “senility and heart failure”;he never fully recovered from a stroke which, according to the Kentish Mercury,had actually occurred in October 1922.The paper said Blackburne “was able to leave his room last summer and go for short walks, but he has been confined to his be practically ever since”.
Black had a beautiful grave but as we can see on page 504 but  it is slowly time for some chess fans to raise money for a restoration.
One of Blackburne famous game is: Blackburne,Joseph Henry - Nimzowitsch,Aaron [A00]
St Petersburg preliminary St Petersburg (8), 02.05.1914
1.e3 d6 2.f4 e5 3.fxe5 dxe5 4.Nc3 Bd6 5.e4 Be6 6.Nf3 f6 7.d3 Ne7 8.Be3 c5 9.Qd2 Nbc6  10.Be2 Nd4 11.0-0 0-0 12.Nd1 Nec6 13.c3 Nxe2+ 14.Qxe2 Re8 15.Nh4 Bf8 16.Nf5 Kh8 17.g4 Qd7 18.Nf2 a5 19.a3 b5 20.Rad1 Rab8 21.Rd2 b4 22.axb4 axb4 23.c4 Ra8 24.Qf3 Ra2 25.g5 g6 26.Ng4 gxf5 27.Nxf6 Nd4 28.Qf2 Qc6 29.Nxe8 Qxe8 30.Bxd4 exd4 31.exf5 Bd7 32.Re1 Qf7 33.Qh4 Ra8 34.Rf2 Bc6 35.Qg4 Re8 36.Rxe8 Qxe8 37.Re2 Qd7 38.Re6 Ba8 39.g6 hxg6 40.Rxg6 Qh7 41.Qg3 Qh5 42.Rg4 1-0.
Tim Harding describes in his book one of the most famous Blackburne anecdotes where Nimzowitsch said the famous words”Der Alte Ganeff hat mich beschwindelt”.
For the interested reader please also see the eye witness report from Erik Christensen Skkbladet or Aaron Nimzowitsch On the road to Chess mastery 1886-1924 by Per Skjoldager and Jorn Erik Nielsen  McFarland 2012.
In 1914, at the age of 72, Blackburne won the 11TH British Championship together with Yates but bad health did hold Blackburne back for a match.
As Harding explains: Britain declared war a few days before this tournament began in Chester.Although recognizing there would be many withdrawals,the B.C.F decided to go ahead with the Congress.As the Yorkshire Weekly Post,15 August,commented,they probably took into account that some people, especially Australian champion Viner,had untdertaken long journeys in order to participate.
Blackburne enjoyed playing the Latvian Gambit and in this book 3 of them are covered but my database also gives: Gamman - Blackburne,Joseph Henry [C40]
London, 1869
1.e4 e5 2.Nf3 f5 3.Nxe5 Nf6 4.Bc4 fxe4 5.Bf7+ Ke7 6.Bb3 d5 7.d4 c5 8.Bg5 Nc6 9.Qh5 Qe8 10.Qh4 cxd4 11.Bxd5 Nxe5 12.Qxe4 Kd6 13.Bxf6 gxf6 14.f4 Bf5 15.fxe5+ Qxe5 16.Qxe5+ fxe5 17.Bb3 Bh6 18.Na3 Kc5 19.0-0 Rhf8 20.Rad1 Be3+ 21.Kh1 b5 22.Nb1 Bg4 23.Rde1 Be2 24.Rxf8 Rxf8 25.h3 Rf2 26.c3 d3 27.Bd1 e4 28.b4+ Kd6 29.Na3 a6 30.c4 Kc6 31.cxb5+ axb5 32.Nb1 Bd4 33.Nd2 Bc3 34.Kg1 Bxd2 35.Kxf2 e3+ 0-1.
Blackburne,Joseph Henry - Chamier [C40]
Adelaide, 1885
1.e4 e5 2.Nf3 f5 3.Nxe5 Qf6 4.d4 d6 5.Nc4 fxe4 6.Nc3 Qg6 7.f3 exf3 8.Qxf3 Nf6 9.Bd3 Qf7 [9...Qg4] 10.0-0 Be7 11.Bg5 [11.Ne3] 11...0-0 [11...Nc6 12.Nb5 Kd8 13.c3 (13.d5 Qxd5 14.Qxd5 Nxd5 15.Bxe7+ Kxe7 16.Rae1+ Kd8 17.Rf7 a6) 13...Be6 14.Qe2 a6] 12.Qg3 Be6 13.Ne3 c6 14.Rf3 d5 15.Raf1 Nbd7 16.Qh4 g6 17.Ne2 Qe8 18.Nf4 Bf7 19.Rh3 h5 20.Nxh5 gxh5 [20...Nxh5 21.Bxe7] 21.Bxf6 Bxf6 22.Rxf6 Nxf6 23.Qg5+ Bg6 [23...Kh8 24.Qxf6+ Kg8 25.Rg3+] 24.Bxg6 Rf7 25.Rf3 Rg7 26.Rxf6 Qe7 27.h4 Rf8 28.Rxf8+ Qxf8 29.Nf5 1-0.
Blackburne,Joseph Henry - Englisch,B [C40]
Hamburg, 1885
1.e4 e5 2.Nf3 f5 3.d4 exd4 4.e5 Bc5 5.Be2 Nc6 6.0-0 Nge7 7.c3 dxc3 8.Nxc3 d5 9.exd6 Qxd6 10.Qa4 Bb6 11.Bg5 0-0 12.Rad1 Qg6 13.Qh4 Re8 14.Rfe1 h6 15.Bc4+ Kf8 16.Bxe7+ Nxe7 17.Rd8 Bc5 18.Ne5 Qf6 19.Qxf6+ gxf6 20.Ng6+ Kg7 21.Rxe8 Nxg6 22.Rg8+ Kh7 23.Ree8 Ne7 24.Rh8+ Kg7 25.Ne2 b5 26.Bb3 a5 27.Nf4 a4 28.Bd1 Bd6 29.Nh5+ Kg6 30.Rhf8 f4 31.h4 Nd5 32.Rg8+ Kf7 33.Rxc8 1-0 and Showalter,Jackson Whipps - Blackburne,Joseph Henry [C41]
London (28), 07.07.1899
1.e4 e5 2.Nf3 d6 3.d4 f5 4.dxe5 fxe4 5.Nd4 d5 6.Nc3 c6 7.Be2 Bb4 8.0-0 Ne7 9.Bh5+ Ng6 10.f4 0-0 11.Bxg6 hxg6 12.Nce2 Qh4 13.Be3 Na6 14.c3 Bc5 15.b4 Bb6 16.Qb3 Qe7 17.a4 Be6 18.a5 Bxd4 19.Nxd4 Rac8 20.Nxe6 Qxe6 21.Bxa7 g5 22.Rae1 Nc7 23.Bb6 gxf4 24.Bxc7 Rxc7 25.Rxe4 Rcf7 26.Re2 f3 27.gxf3 Rxf3 28.Rfe1 Qh3 29.Qb1 Qh4 30.e6 Rf2 0-1.
Conclusion: Certainley one of the best chess biography’s of all time!


Mastering Chess Middlegames
Lectures from the All-Russian School of Grandmasters
by Alexander Panchenko

New in Chess
http://www.newinchess.com/
272  pages
Price € 22,95
ISBN 978-90-569-1609-1



It is for me a great pleasure to announce this wonderful created lecture book,Mastering Chess Middlegames from the great late Alexander Panchenko {1953-2009}.
It was Panchenko who said: It is impossible to become a strong player without being able to defend.
It was in the time of Louis Paulsen and William Steinitz than men began thinking about the problems of defence, at the end of the 19th century before this players only thought of attack.
Panchenko explains: The principles of defence can be formulated in brief as follows:
1.Recognise clearly that your position is inferior and consider the ways in which its drawbacks can be eliminated. The main thing is that the defence should be planned and well thought out.The heart of the defence should consist not of individual moves,but a clear unified plan.
2.It is necessary to divine the opponent’s plans and try with all possible means to prevent their implementation.
3.Try to defend with the minimum forces necessary and counterattack with the rest {the principle of economy}.Steinitz considered that the king can often defend himself.
4.Do not weaken one’s casteled position without absolute necessity.
5.Having won material, it is always possible to return it at the right moment,otaining other advantages in return, such as piece activity, the better endgame,etc.
A fine example of this all is the move 17…Ne4! In the game: Capablanca,Jose Raul - Alekhine,Alexander [D63]
World Championship 13th Buenos Aires (15), 15.10.1927
1.d4 d5 2.c4 e6 3.Nc3 Nf6 4.Bg5 Nbd7 5.e3 Be7 6.Nf3 0-0 7.Rc1 a6 8.a3 h6 9.Bh4 dxc4 10.Bxc4 c5 11.dxc5 Nxc5 12.Be2 b6 13.Qxd8 [13.0-0] 13...Bxd8?! [13...Rxd8 14.b4 Ncd7! 15.Ne4 Bb7 16.Nxf6+ Nxf6 17.Rc7 Rac8!] 14.0-0 Nb3 15.Rcd1 Bb7 16.Nd2 Nxd2 17.Rxd2 Ne4! 18.Nxe4 Bxh4 19.Nd6 Bd5 20.e4 Rfd8 21.Nxf7 Kxf7 22.exd5 Rxd5 23.Rxd5 exd5 24.Rd1 Bf6 25.Bf3 Rc8 26.Bxd5+ Ke7 27.b3 Bb2 28.a4 Rc1 29.Rxc1 Bxc1 30.Bc4 ½-½
Panchenko explains after 19…Bd5! Alekhine saw this sacrifice from afar,and it leads to an endgame with opposite coloured bishops and a quick draw.
In chapter one I found one of the most difficult types of sacrifices in chess and well played by the great Max Euwe: Euwe,Max - Landau,Salo [D18]
NED-ch11 Netherlands (6), 11.10.1939
1.d4 d5 2.c4 c6 3.Nf3 Nf6 4.Nc3 dxc4 5.a4 Bf5 6.e3 e6 7.Bxc4 Bb4 8.0-0 Nbd7 9.Qb3 Qb6 10.e4 Bg6 11.Bxe6 fxe6 12.a5 Bxa5 13.Qxe6+ Kd8 14.e5 Re8 15.Qh3 Bxc3 16.exf6 Bb4 17.fxg7 Bd6 18.Ne5 Bxe5 19.dxe5 Bf7 20.Rd1 Bd5 21.e6 Nf6 22.Bg5 Ke7 23.Qc3 1-0,
Kasparov later wrote on this game: It is for me a great pleasure to announce this wonderful created lecture book,Mastering Chess Middlegames from the great late Alexander Panchenko {1953-2009}.
It was Panchenko who said: It is impossible to become a strong player without being able to defend.
It was in the time of Louis Paulsen and William Steinitz than men began thinking about the problems of defence, at the end of the 19th century before this players only thought of attack.
Panchenko explains: The principles of defence can be formulated in brief as follows:
1.Recognise clearly that your position is inferior and consider the ways in which its drawbacks can be eliminated. The main thing is that the defence should be planned and well thought out.The heart of the defence should consist not of individual moves,but a clear unified plan.
2.It is necessary to divine the opponent’s plans and try with all possible means to prevent their implementation.
3.Try to defend with the minimum forces necessary and counterattack with the rest {the principle of economy}.Steinitz considered that the king can often defend himself.
4.Do not weaken one’s casteled position without absolute necessity.
5.Having won material, it is always possible to return it at the right moment,otaining other advantages in return, such as piece activity, the better endgame,etc.
A fine example of this all is the move 17…Ne4! In the game: Capablanca,Jose Raul - Alekhine,Alexander [D63]
World Championship 13th Buenos Aires (15), 15.10.1927
1.d4 d5 2.c4 e6 3.Nc3 Nf6 4.Bg5 Nbd7 5.e3 Be7 6.Nf3 0-0 7.Rc1 a6 8.a3 h6 9.Bh4 dxc4 10.Bxc4 c5 11.dxc5 Nxc5 12.Be2 b6 13.Qxd8 [13.0-0] 13...Bxd8?! [13...Rxd8 14.b4 Ncd7! 15.Ne4 Bb7 16.Nxf6+ Nxf6 17.Rc7 Rac8!] 14.0-0 Nb3 15.Rcd1 Bb7 16.Nd2 Nxd2 17.Rxd2 Ne4! 18.Nxe4 Bxh4 19.Nd6 Bd5 20.e4 Rfd8 21.Nxf7 Kxf7 22.exd5 Rxd5 23.Rxd5 exd5 24.Rd1 Bf6 25.Bf3 Rc8 26.Bxd5+ Ke7 27.b3 Bb2 28.a4 Rc1 29.Rxc1 Bxc1 30.Bc4 ½-½
Panchenko explains after 19…Bd5! Alekhine saw this sacrifice from afar,and it leads to an endgame with opposite coloured bishops and a quick draw.
In chapter one I found one of the most difficult types of sacrifices in chess and well played by the great Max Euwe: Euwe,Max - Landau,Salo [D18]
NED-ch11 Netherlands (6), 11.10.1939
1.d4 d5 2.c4 c6 3.Nf3 Nf6 4.Nc3 dxc4 5.a4 Bf5 6.e3 e6 7.Bxc4 Bb4 8.0-0 Nbd7 9.Qb3 Qb6 10.e4 Bg6 11.Bxe6 fxe6 12.a5 Bxa5 13.Qxe6+ Kd8 14.e5 Re8 15.Qh3 Bxc3 16.exf6 Bb4 17.fxg7 Bd6 18.Ne5 Bxe5 19.dxe5 Bf7 20.Rd1 Bd5 21.e6 Nf6 22.Bg5 Ke7 23.Qc3 1-0,
Kasparov later wrote on this game: Very few players are capable of seeing opportunities that present themselves beyond the murky horizon.
A strong point of Alexander Panchenko book are the highly instructive games and lectures packed clearly with inviting exercises, all translated for the first time in English language!
Conclusion: One of those highly instructive New in Chess books!


The Double Queen’s Gambit
A Surprise Weapon for Black
by Alexey Bezgodov

New in Chess
http://www.newinchess.com/
288  pages
Price € 24,95
ISBN 978-90-569-1611-4



Grandmaster Alexey Bezgodov name is related to some highly original opening books as Extreme Caro-Kann and the Liberated Bishop’s defence, but his latest repertoire move to move book on the Double Queen’s Gambit 1.d4 d5 2.c4 c5 is certainly not less interesting.
Bezgodov honestly writes: The idea of writing this book first came to me after I looked at some of Shakhriyar Mamedyarov’s games at the world rapid and blitz championship at Khanty Mansiysk in 2013.I was struck both by his results and by the character of the games.
But closer to home I found players as Viktor Kortchnoi and Jan Timman going down with the
Double Queen’s Gambit!
For example: Kortschnoj,Viktor (2625) - Piket,Jeroen (2590) [D06]
Antwerp,1993
1.d4 d5 2.c4 c5 3.cxd5 Nf6 4.dxc5 Qxd5 5.Qxd5 Nxd5 6.e4 Nb4 7.Na3 e5 8.Nf3 f6 9.Bd2 N8c6 10.Bb5 Bxc5 11.Ke2 Ke7 12.Rhc1 b6 13.Nc4 Ba6 14.Bxa6 Nxa6 15.Ne3 Bxe3 16.Kxe3 Rhc8 17.Rc4 Nd8 18.Rac1 Rxc4 19.Rxc4 Ne6 20.b4 Nac7 21.g3 Nb5 22.Nh4 g6 23.f4 Nd6 24.Rc1 b5 25.f5 Nc4+ 26.Rxc4 bxc4 27.fxe6 Rd8 28.Ng2 Rd3+ 29.Ke2 Ra3 30.Ne3 Rxa2 31.Nxc4 a6 32.h4 Kxe6 33.Kd3 Ra1 34.Be3 Rb1 35.Bc5 Rb3+ 36.Kc2 Rxg3 37.Na5 Rg4 38.Nc6 Rxe4 39.Nb8 a5 40.Kd3 Rxb4 41.Bxb4 axb4 42.Na6 b3 43.Nc5+ Kf5 44.Kc3 Kg4 45.Nd7 Kxh4 46.Nxf6 h5 0-1,in 1956 Kortschnoj was more lucky:
Kortschnoj,Viktor - Gusev,Yuri S [D06]
Poltava Poltava, 1956
1.d4 d5 2.c4 c5 3.cxd5 Nf6 4.dxc5 Qxd5 5.Qxd5 Nxd5 6.e4 Nb4 7.Na3 e6 8.Be3 N8a6 9.Bb5+ Bd7 10.Bxd7+ Kxd7 11.0-0-0+ Kc6 12.Nf3 Bxc5 13.Ne5+ Kb6 14.Rd6+ Nc6 15.Nd7+ 1-0.
Fascinating is the gambit line with: Umanskaya,Irina (2295) - Gorbatov,Alexej (2415) [D06]
Moscow-ch,1996
1.d4 d5 2.c4 c5 3.Nc3 cxd4 4.Qxd4 Nc6 5.Qxd5 Be6 6.Qb5 a6 7.Qa4 g6 8.e3 Bg7 9.Nf3 Bxc3+ 10.bxc3 Nf6 11.Be2 Qa5 12.Qxa5 Nxa5 13.Nd2 Rc8 14.Rb1 Bf5 15.Rb4 Rc7 16.Bf3 Bd3 17.Nb3 Nc6 18.Rxb7 Kd8 19.Rb6 Ne5 20.Be2 Bxc4 21.Bxc4 Nxc4 22.Rb8+ Rc8 23.Rxc8+ Kxc8 24.Nd2 Ne5 25.Ba3 Kd7 26.0-0 Rc8 27.Rd1 Ke6 28.Nb3 Ne4 29.Nd4+ Kf6 30.Ne2 Nc4 31.Bc1 e5 32.f3 Nc5 33.e4 Rb8 34.Kf2 Ke6 35.Be3 Na4 36.f4 Rb2 37.Bc1 Rxa2 38.fxe5 Nxc3 39.Re1 Nxe5 40.Ke3 Ng4+ 0-1,white did castle very late here but the king was needed in the centre to support the valuable pawn on c3.
Things would not be so easy for black after 26.f4 Neg4 27.f4 Neg4 27.Ke2 Nd5 28.Rc1 with better play.
With 1.d4 d5 2.c4 c5 3.cxd5 Qxd5 4.e3 cxd4 5.exd4 e5 black transposes into the Alapin Variation of the Sicilian.
A classic beauty is Nimzowitsch,Aaron - Giersing,Johannes Hjalmar [A31]
Nordic Federation Copenhagen (3), 13.08.1924
1.d4 d5 2.Nf3 c5 3.c4 cxd4 4.cxd5 Nf6 5.Nxd4 Qxd5 6.Nc3 Qa5 7.Nb3 Qh5 8.Bd2 e5 9.Nb5 Na6 10.Bc3 Ne4 11.Qd5 Nxc3 12.bxc3 Qg5 13.Nd2 Qe7 14.Nc4 Qe6 15.Qxe5 Qxe5 16.Nxe5 Be6 17.e3 Bc5 18.Bc4 Ke7 19.Bxe6 Kxe6 20.Nf3 Rac8 21.Ke2 Nc7 22.Nxc7+ Rxc7 23.Rhb1 a6 24.a4 b6 25.Rb3 f6 26.Rab1 Rhc8 27.R1b2 Kd5 28.Kd3 Rd7 29.Nd4 g6 30.g4 Rdc7 31.h4 Re8 32.Rb1 Rec8 33.f4 Re8 34.e4+ Kd6 35.g5 fxg5 36.e5+ Kd7 37.hxg5 Kc8 38.Ke4 Rf7 39.R3b2 Kc7 40.Rh2 Ree7 41.Rd1 Re8 42.Rhd2 Rg7 43.Nb3 Ba3 44.Rd5 Rf7 45.Nd4 Kc8 46.Nc2 Bf8 47.R1d4 Bc5 48.Rc4 Ref8 49.Kf3 Rd7 50.Rxd7 Kxd7 51.Nb4 a5 52.Ke4 axb4 53.cxb4 Bg1 54.Rc2 b5 55.axb5 Rb8 56.Rg2 Ba7 57.Rh2 Rh8 58.f5 gxf5+ 59.Kxf5 Rf8+ 60.Ke4 Rf7 61.b6 Bb8 62.Kd5 Re7 63.e6+ Kc8 64.Rf2 Re8 65.Rf7 Rd8+ 66.Kc4 Re8 67.b7+ Kd8 68.Rd7# 1-0,and Nimzowitsch later wrote: This was my most difficult game during the tournament,Tidskrift für Schack 1924.
Included is an impressive bibliography!
Conclusion: Phenomenal! 

Chess DVD's


The Berlin Wall
by  Viktor Bologan

2015
http://www.chessbase.com
E-Mail info@chessbase.com
Price Euro 29.90
Pentium-Processor at 300 Mhz or higher, 64 MB RAM, Windows XP, Windows Vista, Windows 7, DVD drive, mouse, soundcard




The great Victor Bologan digs with model games and comprehensive analyses in the Legendary Berlin Wall defence that runs with the moves 1.e4 e5 2.Nf3 Nc6 3.Bb5 Nf6 4.0-0 Nxe4 5.d4 Nd6 6.Bxc6 dxc6 7.dxe5 Nf5 8.Qxd8+ Kxd8.
Funny enough when you remove all pieces except the kings than black is the one that is going to loose but he has two dangerous bishops and that are the souls of the black position and that makes black uncrackable!
As we can see in the extra model games file latest games have been included by Bologan:
So,Wesley (2779) - Harikrishna,Penteala (2740) [C67]
TUR-chT Kocaeli (11.4), 13.08.2015
1.e4 e5 2.Nf3 Nc6 3.Bb5 Nf6 4.0-0 Nxe4 5.d4 Nd6 6.Bxc6 dxc6 7.dxe5 Nf5 8.Qxd8+ Kxd8 9.h3 Bd7 10.Rd1 Be7 11.g4 Nh4 12.Nxh4 Bxh4 13.Nd2 Ke8 14.Ne4 Rd8 15.Bf4 Be7 16.b3 Be6 17.c4 h6 18.Kg2 a5 19.Be3 h5 20.f3 hxg4 21.hxg4 f5 22.exf6 gxf6 23.Rxd8+ Bxd8 24.Rd1 Kf7 25.Bd4 Rg8 26.Kf2 f5 27.gxf5 Bxf5 28.Be5 Bxe4 29.fxe4 Ke6 30.Bf4 Rf8 31.Kg3 Rh8 32.Rd2 Bf6 33.Rh2 Rxh2 34.Kxh2 Be5 35.Kg3 Bd6 36.Kf3 c5 37.Bd2 b6 38.Bf4 Kf6 39.Kg4 Ke6 40.Kg5 Be7+ 41.Kh5 Bd6 42.Kg4 Kf6 43.Kf3 Ke6 44.Bd2 Be5 45.Ke3 Kf6 46.Kd3 Ke6 47.Kc2 Kf6 48.Bc3 Bxc3 49.Kxc3 Ke5 50.Kd3 Kf4 51.a3 c6 52.a4 Kg5 53.Ke3 Kg4 54.Ke2 Kf4 55.Kd3 Kg5 56.Ke3 ½-½.
But his analyses are not less interesting as we ca: 9.h3-Bd7 - for-black [C67]
1.e4 e5 2.Nf3 Nc6 3.Bb5 Nf6 4.0-0 Nxe4 5.n see in the following line: d4 Nd6 6.Bxc6 dxc6 7.dxe5 Nf5 8.Qxd8+ Kxd8 9.h3 Bd7 10.Rd1 [10.g4 Ne7 11.Ng5 Ke8] 10...Be7 [10...b6 11.g4 Nh6 12.Nc3] 11.Bg5 [11.Nc3 Kc8 12.g4 Nh4 13.Nxh4 Bxh4 14.Ne4 (14.Be3 b6 15.Rd2 c5 16.Nd5 Re8 (16...Be6 17.Nf4 Bd7 18.Rad1 Bc6 19.Nd5 Re8) 17.Rad1 Bc6 18.Bf4 h6 19.Kg2 Kb7 20.c4 Caruana,F 2789 - Adams,Mi 2743 , Dortmund GER 19.7.2014 42nd GM 2014 20...Re6 21.Bh2 f6 22.exf6 Rxf6 23.Bg3 Bg5 24.Re2 Rf7 25.h4 Bf6³) 14...b6 15.Bg5 (15.g5 Bf5 16.Rd4 Rd8) 15...Bxg5 16.Nxg5 h6 17.Nxf7 Re8 18.f4 Be6 19.Nxh6 gxh6 20.f5 Bxf5 21.gxf5 Rxe5 22.Rf1 Kd7 23.Rad1+ Ke7 24.Rfe1 (24.f6+ Ke6) 24...Kf6 25.Rxe5 Kxe5 26.Rd7 c5 27.Kf2 Rf8 = Karjakin,Sergey 2771 - Carlsen,M 2881 , Stavanger NOR 9.6.2014 2nd Norway Chess 2014;
11.g4 Nh4 12.Nxh4 Bxh4 13.Nd2 Ke8 prepare to take on e6 with the king (13...h6 14.Nf3 Be7 15.e6 fxe6 16.Ne5 Bd6 17.Nf7+ Ke7 18.Nxh8 Rxh8 19.b3) 14.Ne4 h5 15.f3 Rd8 16.Kg2 (16.Bg5 Bxg5 17.Nxg5 Ke7 18.Kg2 hxg4 19.hxg4 Be6) ;
11.c4 Kc8 12.Nc3 b6 13.Bg5 Bxg5 (13...Re8 14.g4 Bxg5 15.Nxg5 Nh4 16.f4 h6 17.Nge4 h5 18.gxh5 Rh8 19.Ng3 Bxh3 20.Kf2 Nf5 21.Nce4 Nh6 22.Rh1 Be6³ Naiditsch,A 2705 - Adams,Mi 2743 , Dortmund GER 12.7.2014 42nd GM 2014) 14.Nxg5 h6 15.Nxf7 Rf8 16.e6 Bxe6 17.Ne5 Kb7] 11...Kc8 12.Bxe7 [12.g4 h6 13.Bd2 (13.Bxe7 Nxe7 14.Kh2 Re8 15.Nbd2 b6 16.Re1 c5 17.Ne4 Bc6 18.h4 Kb7 19.Rad1 Ng6 20.h5 Nf8 21.Kg3 Re7 22.Rd3 Rae8³ Sutovsky E 2692 - Hammer J 2606 , 27.3.2011 12th ch-EUR) 13...Nh4 14.Nxh4 Bxh4 15.Bc3 h5 16.f3 hxg4 17.hxg4 Bg3 18.Nd2 Ganguly S 2651 - Hammer J 2647 , 16.1.2011 73rd Tata Steel GMB 18...Bf4 (18...Re8 19.e6 Bxe6 20.Ne4 Bh4 21.Bxg7 Bxg4 22.fxg4 Rxe4) 19.Nf1 c5 20.Re1 b6] 12...Nxe7 13.Nc3 [13.Ng5 h6 14.Nxf7 Rf8 15.e6 Bxe6 16.Ne5 b6] 13...h6 [13...Re8 14.Rd2 Ng6 15.Rad1 Be6 16.Kh2f] 14.Ne2 [14.Rd2 c5 15.Rad1 Be6 16.Ne1 Ng6 17.Nd3 b6 18.Ne2 Bxa2 19.b3 c4 20.Ndc1 cxb3 21.cxb3 Bb1³ Anand,V 2775 - Carlsen,M 2870 , Chennai IND 13.11.2013 WCh 2013] 14...Ng6 15.Ng3 c5 16.Nh5 Rg8 17.Re1 Naiditsch,A 2709 - Adams,Mi 2740 , Tromso NOR 4.8.2014 41st Olympiad Open 2014 17...Bc6 18.Kh2 b6 19.e6 fxe6 20.Rxe6 Bxf3 21.gxf3 Nh4.
This all is well packed in well explained in 4 hours and 7 minutes video time!
Conclusion: One of those super made ChessBase DVD’s!


The Classical Sicilian
by  Mihail Marin

2015
http://www.chessbase.com
E-Mail info@chessbase.com
Price Euro 29.90
Pentium-Processor at 300 Mhz or higher, 64 MB RAM, Windows XP, Windows Vista, Windows 7, DVD drive, mouse, soundcard




The well known  Mihail Marin provides the user of this DVD with a well thought repertoire defence based on the lines of the Sicilian defence,where I found defences for black as the Richter Rauzer: 1.e4 c5 2.Nf3 Nc6 3.d4 cxd4 4.Nxd4 Nf6 5.Nc3 d6 6.Bg5 e6 7.Qd2 a6 8.0-0-0 Bd7 9.f4 b5 10.Bxf6 gxf6 11.f5 Qb6,Velimirovic: 1.e4 c5 2.Nf3 d6 3.d4 cxd4 4.Nxd4 Nf6 5.Nc3 Nc6 6.Bc4 e6 7.Be3 a6 8.Qe2 Qc7 9.0-0-0 Bd7 10.Bb3 b5 11.Nxc6 Bxc6 12.Bd4 Be7 13.Bxf6 Bxf6 14.Nd5 Bxd5 15.exd5 e5 16.Rd3 Qd7 17.Rc3 a5,English Attack with 6…Ng4: 1.e4 c5 2.Nf3 Nc6 3.d4 cxd4 4.Nxd4 Nf6 5.Nc3 d6 6.Be3 Ng4 7.Bb5 Nxe3 8.fxe3 Bd7 9.0-0 e6 10.Bxc6 bxc6 11.e5 Be7 12.exd6 Bxd6 13.Qh5 0-0,positional lines and more!
Included is an extra database of 221 entries where many of them hold excellent analyses!
A fine example of this all is: Popov,Ivan1 (2476) - Timofeev,Artyom (2619) [B59]
RUS-ch U20 Nojabrsk (9), 10.03.2005
[Gofshtein,L]
1.e4 c5 2.Nf3 Nc6 3.Nc3 d6 4.d4 cxd4 5.Nxd4 Nf6 6.Be2 e5 7.Nb3 A more coomon move in this position is 7.Nf3 [7.Nf3!?] 7...Be7 8.0-0 0-0 9.f4 a5 A typical move in this line. Black forces a2-a4 and gets the b4 square to himself 10.a4 Nb4 From this square the knight controls the d5 square and also attacks the c2 pawn 11.f5 In case of a waiting tactics black gets a good counterplay as the next lines show [11.Rf2 Qb6 12.Bf3 Be6 13.Qe2 Nxc2 14.Qxc2 Bxb3µ 0-1 Beliayev,S-Maksimenko,I/Donetsk 2000/EXT 2003 (31);
11.Bf3 Qc7 12.Kh1 Be6 13.Be3 Rfd8 14.Qc1 Bc4 15.Rd1 Rac8 16.Nd2 Ba6 17.Nf1 Nd7 18.Ng3 Nb6" 0-1 Horowitz,I-Geller,E/New York 1954/MCL (43)] 11...h6!?N A novelty. Black prevents from white to develop the bishop to g5 and prepares the advance d6-d5 [11...d5 12.exd5 Nbxd5 13.Nxd5 Nxd5 14.Qd3 (14.Bf3 Qb6+ 15.Kh1 Nb4 16.Be4 Rd8 17.Qh5 Qf6 0-1 Custard Gasco,D-Draghici Flutur,G/Valencia 2003/CBM 096 ext (37)) 14...Nb4 15.Qe4 Bd7 16.c3 Bc6" ½-½ Puiggros,G-Schweber,S/Quilmes 1959/MCL (41);
11...b6 12.Bf3 Bb7 13.Bg5 Rc8 14.Rf2 Qd7 15.Be3 Qc6 16.Nd5 Nfxd5 17.exd5 Qc4" 0-1 Marinescu,E-Mosnegutu,M/Eforie Nord 2000/EXT 2004 (28)] 12.Bc4 White tries unsuccessfully to take control over the d5 square [12.Bf3 Qb6+ 13.Rf2 d5";
12.Kh1 d5 13.exd5 Nfxd5 14.Ne4 Nf6"] 12...Qc7 13.Bd5 [13.Nd2 d5 14.exd5 Rd8"] 13...Nbxd5 14.exd5 It was interesting to check 14.Nd5 which led to an unclear game [14.Nxd5!? Nxd5 15.Qxd5 (15.exd5 Qc4") 15...Qxc2 16.Bd2 (16.Nxa5 Rxa5 17.Qxa5 Qxe4©) 16...Bd7 17.Qxb7 Bc6 18.Qxe7 Qxb3 19.f6÷] 14...Qc4!? Black plans to activize his pieces 15.Be3 [15.Qf3 Bd7"] 15...Ng4?! Black plays very recklessly. A quiet 15...Bd7 gave him a fine counterplay [15...Bd7 16.Qf3 Rfc8"] 16.Nd2 Qb4 17.Qe2 Nxe3 18.Qxe3 Bg5 19.Qd3 g6 Black tries to break white's blockade by sacrificing a pawn [19...Bf4 20.f6 gxf6 21.Nc4 f5 22.Kh1 Rd8 23.b3] 20.f6?! After 20.fg as the lines show, white has a good perspectives [20.fxg6!? f5 21.Nc4 Rf6 22.Ra3 Rxg6 23.Rb3 Qc5+ 24.Kh1 Ra6 25.Nb5±] 20...Qd4+!? 21.Qxd4 exd4 22.Nce4 Be3+ 23.Kh1 Bf5f Now it is already black who seizes the initiative 24.g4 Trying to sharpen the game white sacrifices an exchange [24.Rfe1 Rfc8 25.c4 dxc3 26.Rxe3 cxd2 27.Nxd2 Rc2f] 24...Bxg4µ 25.Nc4 Be2 26.Ncxd6 Rfd8! A precise move. White cannot move the rook because of Bf3 27.Kg2 Bxf1+ 28.Rxf1 Rd7 28...Ra6 deserved a serious attention, givving back the exchange but staying with an extra pawn [28...Ra6!? 29.Nb5 Rxd5 30.Nc7 Rg5+ (30...Re5 31.Nxa6 Rxe4 32.Nc5 Re8 33.Kf3 b6 34.Ne4) 31.Nxg5 Rc6 32.c3 Bxg5 33.Nd5 Kh7µ] 29.c4 dxc3 30.bxc3 Bc5 [30...Rad8 31.Nc4 Ba7 32.d6] 31.Nxc5 [31.Nxb7 Ba3 32.Rb1 Re8µ] 31...Rxd6 32.c4 Rb6 Black tries to activize his pieces [32...b6 33.Ne4 Rd7 34.Rd1] 33.Rd1 Rd8 Firstly defending against the advance of the d-pawn [33...Rc8?! 34.d6 Rd8 35.d7] 34.Rd4 g5 35.h4 gxh4 36.Ne4? A weak move after which black wins. After the correct 36.Kh3 the outcome of the game is not clear yet, here are some possible lines: [36.Kh3! Rb4 (36...Rxf6 37.Nxb7 Rd7 38.Nc5 Rc7 39.Nd3) 37.d6! b6 38.Nd3 Rxa4 39.Ne5 Ra3+ 40.Kxh4 Re3 41.Nc6 Rd7 42.Nb8 Rd8 43.Nc6=] 36...Rb4 37.d6 Rxa4 38.Nc5 Rb4 Givving way for the a-pawn black gets a decisive advantage [38...Ra2+ 39.Kh3 b6] 39.d7 a4 40.Rd3 a3 41.Re3 [41.Rxa3 Rxc4 42.Re3 Kf8-+] 41...a2 42.Re8+ Kh7 43.Rxd8 a1Q 44.Rh8+ Kg6 45.d8Q Rb2+ White's king is totally exposed and gets under the fire of the black heavy pieces. Of course, black easily mates after a series of checks, that's why white resigned 0-1,all this all is well packed in 5 hours video time!
Conclusion: Grandmaster made level repertoire DVD!



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